Poppy seeds are classified as prohibited goods by the Central Narcotics Bureau (CNB). Any company or person who wishes to import them or any foodstuff that contain the substance (regardless of the amount or purpose) must submit the Inward Declaration Form which can also be downloaded here together with a certificate from the exporting country or the country of origin of the poppy seeds.

The importer must send a sample of the seeds or related product to the Health Sciences Authority located at 11 Outram Road, Singapore 169078 for analysis. If the sample is in the form of seeds, it is to be sent to the Division Director, Illicit Drugs Division, Applied Sciences Group, Health Sciences Authority (HSA) (Attn: Dr Angeline Yap).

If the sample is in the form of food products, it is to be sent to the Division Director, Food Safety Division, Applied Sciences Group, HSA (Attn: Ms Joanne Chan).

The HSA report must be submitted to the Central Narcotics Bureau (CNB). In the event HSA certifies that the poppy seeds are cleared of any controlled substances, ie no traces of morphine detected, CNB will endorse and approve the Inward Declaration Form. With the endorsement by CNB, Singapore Customs will allow the poppy seeds to be imported into Singapore. If the poppy seeds are found to contain traces of controlled substances, the approval for importation will not be given.

This is false! Cannabis poses as much dangers as other drugs. Abusers could experience:

  • Difficulties in maintaining coherent thought
  • Difficulties in estimating elapsed time
  • Memory impairment
  • Disorientation
  • Anxiety, delusion, aggressiveness (in more severe cases)
  • Rapid pulse, increased blood pressure
  • Dry Mouth
  • Affects the heart and lungs
  • Difficulties in coordination

Cannabis is a Class A drug under the Misuse of Drugs Act. Possession or consumption of Cannabis up to 10 years of imprisonment or S$20,000 fine or BOTH.

This is false! Studies have shown that frequent cannabis use can lead to addiction, meaning abusers have difficulty controlling their drug use and are often unable to stop, even though it interferes with their lives. In other words, they become addicted.

Cannabis poses as much danger as other drugs. It not only impairs your mental functions, such as inducing difficulty in forming coherent thoughts, it also causes disorientation. Long term use also affects the heart and lungs negatively.

Cannabis is a Class A drug under the Misuse of Drugs Act. Possession or consumption of Cannabis up to 10 years of imprisonment or S$20,000 fine or BOTH.

Cannabis harms the body. Abuse of cannabis is linked to several negative effects on mental and physical health.

  • Possible psychological dependence
  • Loss of drive and interest in sustained activity in long-term users
  • Increased risk of anxiety, depression and schizophrenia
  • Affects the heart and lungs

How to spot the signs of cannabis abusers:

Physical signs

  • Large, increased pupils
  • Conjunctivitis (‘red eyes’)
  • Drooping eyelids
  • Rapid pulse, increased blood pressure
  • Dry Mouth
  • Nausea, with vomiting

Mental Signs

  • Difficulties in maintain coherent thought
  • Difficulties in estimating elapsed time
  • Memory impairment
  • Sense of euphoria
  • Disorientation
  • Anxiety, delusion, aggressiveness (in more severe cases)
  • Loss of motivation

Cannabis abusers may experience the following withdrawal symptoms: Moodiness, irritability, anxiety and tension.

If you know of anyone who is abusing cannabis, please notify us by calling the CNB Hotline 1800-3256666.

The botanical name for hemp plant is Cannabis sativa. In other words, hemp is cannabis. This means that all hemp proteins, fibre, seeds, oils etc that are derived from the hemp plant are derived from the Cannabis Sativa plant.

We would like to remind importers, retailers and members of the public that products containing hemp derivatives as an ingredient should not be imported, supplied etc.

Cannabis and its derivatives are listed as Class ‘A’ controlled drugs in the First Schedule of the Misuse of Drugs Act. In addition, Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the psychoactive chemical substance in cannabis that causes users to feel “high”; there are adverse health impact linked to its use and it is a Class A controlled drug in the First Schedule of the Misuse of Drugs Act. Any products derived from the Cannabis Sativa plant or its seeds can contain controlled drugs such as THC despite the product labels indicating otherwise.

Singapore adopts a strict policy of zero tolerance towards controlled drugs. The importation / exportation, possession, sale and consumption of controlled drugs or products containing controlled drugs, even in trace amounts, is an offence under the MDA. The Central Narcotics Bureau will investigate and take necessary action against importers and retailers found dealing in controlled drugs or products containing them.

Cannabidiol (CBD) and Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) are cannabinoids commonly found in the Cannabis Sativa plant. Many CBD oil products have been claimed to be derived from the hemp plant or hemp seed. Do note that the hemp plant is the plant Cannabis Sativa.

Cannabis and its derivatives are listed as Class ‘A’ controlled drugs in the First Schedule of the Misuse of Drugs Act. In addition, THC is the psychoactive chemical substance in cannabis that causes users to feel “high”; there are adverse health impact linked to its use and it is a Class A controlled drug in the First Schedule of the Misuse of Drugs Act.

We would like to remind importers, retailers and members of the public that any products derived from the Cannabis Sativa plant or its seeds can contain controlled drugs such as THC despite the product labels indicating otherwise.

Singapore adopts a strict policy of zero tolerance towards controlled drugs. The importation, trafficking and possession of controlled drugs carry heavy penalties on conviction under the Misuse of Drugs Act. The Central Narcotics Bureau will investigate and take necessary action against importers and retailers found dealing in controlled drugs or products containing them.

Under Regulation 19 to the Misuse of Drugs Regulations, a medical practitioner who attends to a person whom he considers or has reasonable grounds to suspect is a drug addict shall provide to both the Director of Medical Services and the Director of the Central Narcotics Bureau, specific information relating to that person. This information should be provided within 7 days from date of attendance. 

You can report the information via e-Notif